Episode 18: Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness

March 25, 2021 01:23:01
Episode 18: Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness
Latter-day Contemplation
Episode 18: Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness
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Show Notes

Christopher is joined again with his guest co-host, Shiloh Logan, to talk about the fifth Beatitude. After the last episode’s conversation concerning meekness, there is a better foundation for understanding and experiencing, at least in part, what it means to “hunger and thirst after righteousness.” What is this hungering? How do we experience this in our daily lives, and are we–in our actual lived experiences–truly feeling “filled.” We may say with confidence that we feel the “peace” of the gospel of Jesus Christ, but do we feel the inspiratation of the gospel’s awe and wonder? Is our religious experience reduced to a checklist of things believed and tasks completed, or is there something more to the gospel of Jesus Christ and of our relationship with the divine? Enos, in the Book of Mormon, gives us a good scriptural example through his own initial journey in following the Beatitude-path in hungering and in being filled — but how do we do this for ourselves? Sometimes it requires that we go back to the beginning and start over with the emptying of the first Beatitude and letting God be God in our lives.

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