Episode 67: The Bhagavad Gita (Part 2)

May 05, 2022 01:07:25
Episode 67: The Bhagavad Gita (Part 2)
Latter-day Contemplation
Episode 67: The Bhagavad Gita (Part 2)
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Show Notes

In this episode Christopher and Riley welcome Phil McLemore and Ben Heaton, Bhagavad Gita enthusiasts and students of Vedic wisdom, to finish our discussion of the seminal Hindu scripture.  Our hosts dive into the usefulness of the book, approaches to understanding it, and a few favorite passages.

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